Cry me a river (or listening to the “poor” wealthy folk whine about taxes)

Some whiny wealthy law professor by the name of  Todd Henderson writes for a blog hosted here on wordpress.com (as is the one you’re reading now). He recently posted an apology for a post he had made a few days prior.

The blog post he was apologizing for was titled We are the Super Rich and was located here.  But (per the above mentioned apology) he took it down.  But thanks to the friendly folks over at Google. You can still view it via Google Cache.

But just for shits and giggles, I copied the text from the cache of the original and have posted it below for you to mock along with the rest of us “poor folks”.

We are the Super Rich

The rhetoric in Washington about taxes is about millionaires and the super rich, but the relevant dividing line between millionaires and the middle class is pegged at family income of $250,000. (I’m not a math professor, but last time I checked $250,000 is less than $1 million.) That makes me super rich and subject to a big tax hike if the president has his way.
I’m the president’s neighbor in Chicago, but we’ve never met. I wish we could, because I would introduce him to my family and our lifestyle, one he believes is capable of financing the vast expansion of government he is planning. A quick look at our family budget, which I will happily share with the White House, will show him that like many Americans, we are just getting by despite seeming to be rich. We aren’t.
I, like the president before me, am a law professor at the University of Chicago Law School, and my wife, like the first lady before her, works at the University of Chicago Hospitals, where she is a doctor who treats children with cancer. Our combined income exceeds the $250,000 threshold for the super rich (but not by that much), and the president plans on raising my taxes. After all, we can afford it, and the world we are now living in has that familiar Marxian tone of those who need take and those who can afford it pay. The problem is, we can’t afford it. Here is why.
The biggest expense for us is financing government. Last year, my wife and I paid nearly $100,000 in federal and state taxes, not even including sales and other taxes. This amount is so high because we can’t afford fancy accountants and lawyers to help us evade taxes and we are penalized by the tax code because we choose to be married and we both work outside the home. (If my wife and I divorced or were never married, the government would write us a check for tens of thousands of dollars. Talk about perverse incentives.)
Our next biggest expense, like most people, is our mortgage. Homes near our work in Chicago aren’t cheap and we do not have friends who were willing to help us finance the deal. We chose to invest in the University community and renovate and old property, but we did so at an inopportune time.
We pay about $15,000 in property taxes, about half of which goes to fund public education in Chicago. Since we care the education of our three children, this means we also have to pay to send them to private school. My wife has school loans of nearly $250,000 and I do too, although becoming a lawyer is significantly cheaper. We try to invest in our retirement by putting some money in the stock market, something that these days sounds like a patriotic act. Our account isn’t worth much, and is worth a lot less than it used to be.
Like most working Americans, insurance, doctors’ bills, utilities, two cars, daycare, groceries, gasoline, cell phones, and cable TV (no movie channels) round out our monthly expenses. We also have someone who cuts our grass, cleans our house, and watches our new baby so we can both work outside the home. At the end of all this, we have less than a few hundred dollars per month of discretionary income. We occasionally eat out but with a baby sitter, these nights take a toll on our budget. Life in America is wonderful, but expensive.
If our taxes rise significantly, as they seem likely to, we can cut back on some things. The (legal) immigrant from Mexico who owns the lawn service we employ will suffer, as will the (legal) immigrant from Poland who cleans our house a few times a month. We can cancel our cell phones and some cable channels, as well as take our daughter from her art class at the community art center, but these are only a few hundred dollars per month in total. But more importantly, what is the theory under which collecting this money in taxes and deciding in Washington how to spend it is superior to our decisions? Ask the entrepreneurs we employ and the new arrivals they employ in turn whether they prefer to work for us or get a government handout.
I’ll let you decide for yourself what to think.  I rather liked how it was picked apart over at the Daily Kos, myself.
Advertisements
Posted in Politics. Tags: , , , , , . Comments Off on Cry me a river (or listening to the “poor” wealthy folk whine about taxes)

My thoughts on the 9th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001

My heart and thoughts go out to the families and friends of those who were victims of 9/11.  I’ll never forget that day (or the whole week that followed).

I was on my way to work when I learned of the attacks.  I was at a bus stop, waiting for the bus, when I called my mom about something on my cell phone.  She just assumed I was calling about the attacks.  Then she told me. It was about 90 minutes after the 2nd plane had hit the World Trade Center.  I remember thinking and saying that it was  like something out of a movie.

When I arrived at work (was working a 11-7 shift), they had TVs on and tuned to CNN. The office was unusually quiet.

I was a Travel Agent in a call center then and it was weird not getting any calls for days.   I remember a group of us in the office (about 15 of the 80 or so that worked there) gathering to pray (I’m agnostic, but joined them anyway). We were all crying.

I also had a preplanned flight (several days later) for myself that was almost canceled (well all flights had been canceled but the question was, would mine be reinstated – it was for the Saturday following 9/11).  I got a call the night before from the airline stating it was and to arrive at the airport 2 hours early.

There were armed national guard troops walking on the tarmac and standing on the roof of the concourses and terminal.

I remember the captain thanking us for flying @ that time. And saying a few words about 9/11.  The cabin was 3/4 empty and deathly quiet for it’s 2 1/2 hour duration.

I also had no TV at home that week. I couldn’t afford to pay my cable bill at the time so my cable had been cut off.  I lived in an apartment where rabbit ears would not work.  So I missed most all of the TV coverage for days.  It was 2 weeks later that I got my cable back.   I had to wait a year for the first anniversary, when networks replayed the tape of several hours of coverage that day.  I remember crying all over again.  It was just amazing to me that this all happened.

With that said, the next person who says “never forget” is gonna get bitch slapped! Trust me, I won’t forget!

President Obama’s Address to Congress

Awesome, no?

One of his best speeches, ever.

Posted in Politics. Tags: , , , , . Comments Off on President Obama’s Address to Congress

WTF?!?!

http://www.nypost.com/delonas/2009/02/02182009.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/www.nypost.com/delonas/2009/02/02182009.jpg

The New York Post is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.
Boycott all things News Corp (including but by no means limited to, 20th Century Fox Films, Fox Television Network, Fox Sports Channel, Fox News Channel, HarperCollins Books, Parents Magazine and many more) and their advertisers.

WTF was the New York Post thinking?

Posted in Politics, Racism. Tags: , , , . Comments Off on WTF?!?!

The Inauguration

I can’t think of what to say so….


I’ll just say this:

WOW

Posted in Politics. Comments Off on The Inauguration

Condi Rice: People will soon thank Bush for what he’s done

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said [presumably with a straight face] that despite President Bush’s low approval ratings, people will soon “start to thank this president for what he’s done.”

Now that was good for a laugh!

read more | digg story

Posted in Bush, Iraq, Politics. Tags: , , , . Comments Off on Condi Rice: People will soon thank Bush for what he’s done

Yes we can and yes we did!

And I was so overjoyed that I cried on and off for two hours!

Yes we can and yes we did!

Posted in Politics. Tags: , , , , , , . Comments Off on Yes we can and yes we did!